Immigration: Been there; Done that

Immigration: Been there; Done that

Rather than diminishing our differences, let’s embrace them. What makes us American? Is it our common love for freedom, our innovative spirit or is it fast food, or our “throw away culture?” The truth is, America is a mosaic of numerous cultures, ethnicities, colors and religions—to the point where it has become impossible to use these attributes as a definition of what makes us American. Do we need immigrants?  When immigrants enter the labor force, they increase the productive capacity of the economy and raise the GDP. Their incomes rise, but so do those of natives. It’s a phenomenon dubbed the “immigration surplus,” as stated by Pia Orrenius (George W.Bush Institute). 44% percent of medical scientists are foreign born, for example, as are 42% of computer software developers. Immigrant workers are also overrepresented among college professors, engineers, mathematicians, nurses, doctors and dentists, to name a few. If immigration makes the economy larger, more efficient and productive, what’s the problem? Why do we, as a nation, limit immigration? In the late 1800s, people in many parts of the world decided to leave their homes and migrate to the United States. Fleeing crop failure, land and job shortages and rising taxes and famine, many people came to the U. S. because it was perceived as the land of economic opportunity. Others came seeking personal freedom or relief from political and religious persecution. With hope for a brighter future, nearly 12 million immigrants arrived in the United States between 1870 and 1900. During the 1870s and 1880s, the vast majority of these people were from Germany, Ireland and England – the principal...
Survival of the Fittest – Corporate Firm

Survival of the Fittest – Corporate Firm

Surviving in a large, rigid and sometimes controlling corporate environment can be as hard as swimming alone in an ocean with no coasts in sight. You may feel helpless and on your own, and no matter how much effort you put in, you may feel like you are not going anywhere.  It’s difficult to thrive in this type of environment, when there are no pre-defined goals or aims. Corporate environments with less strict rules, less rigidity and a more defined set of work conditions and responsibilities are somewhat easier to survive and thrive in, although they come with their own set of challenges and obstacles. Working with people from different backgrounds and work cultures, colleague relationships and office politics with its own hierarchies are some challenges that have the potential to create workplace conflicts. Overcoming them can be challenging, but if embraced, can actually help you succeed. A few specific innate characteristics can reduce workplace conflict and assist in a non-hostile work environment such as mutual respect, seamless work integration and beneficial joint progress. “Victory is much more meaningful when it comes not just from one person, but from the joint achievements of many“ said Howard Schultz. Respecting diversity and differences among colleagues is of utmost importance in the global business arena today. Having a blended workforce with not just cultural differences, but work ethic and functional differences is what brings in a fresh wave of energy, unique inputs and a one-of-a-kind workplace vibe. Individuals bring a new and different input and point of view, which when accepted brings in a whole new essence to a collaborative and sustainable...