Mark Szollar, former NY Times Director of Diversity & Recruitment Advertising joins Global Diversity Marketing (GDM)

Mark Szollar, former NY Times Director of Diversity & Recruitment Advertising joins Global Diversity Marketing (GDM)

Leadership Announcement   Global Diversity Marketing (GDM) has announced that Mark Szollar has joined the firm as a Senior Advisor. Mark will be a part of the GDM leadership team, concentrating on new business development.   Mark comes to GDM after a successful career as an Advertising Executive in the media world for over 30 years. Mark spent 28 years of his career at The New York Times, where he worked in a variety of departments and positions, culminating in his position as the Director of Diversity and Recruitment Advertising for the company.  Mark also spent two years as Executive Director of the National Association of Asian MBA’s (NAAMBA). Additionally, Mark is a very active member of Ascend, the largest, non-profit Pan-Asian organization for business professionals in North America with over 60,000 members.  Throughout his professional career Mark has also been an active member in such great diverse organizations such as Prospanica, the National Association of Black Sports Professionals and Veterans Across America. In addition to his professional career, Mark loves youth baseball and volunteers his time umpiring Little League and Babe Ruth baseball. In 2003, he was inducted into the Youth Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, NY, not as a player but as an umpire.   “I am excited to join Global Diversity Marketing (GDM) as a Senior Advisor. Combining my passion for diversity and marketing, this opportunity with GDM enables me to use my skills to help companies better understand these markets,” said Mark Szollar.   “Mark’s extensive experience, his reputation and his passion for diversity makes him a valuable asset for our company. We are...
BUILD YOUR DREAM TEAM: 3 ESSENTIALS

BUILD YOUR DREAM TEAM: 3 ESSENTIALS

Mention “Dream Team” and immediately most think of championship sports teams. Businesses can dominate their competition if their team mirrors the characteristics of the most admired competitive athletic or business champions. Many winning organizations follow these 3 essential steps in creating their version of a “Dream Team.” 1. The Greater Good Short term profit is great, but creating a team that understands how your business affects or changes lives is the path to establishing a legacy. My partner, Tariq Khan and I realized after attending many financial services business meetings that without the infusion of diversity into the fabric of these organizations, one third of the U.S. would not be receiving adequate financial services advice. We truly believe this and infuse this passion with our team daily. What’s your passion and how does your business affect lives? 2. Unique Ability Our team members have individual unique abilities. As Dan Sullivan of the Strategic Coach teaches, focus only on what is your unique ability. Our team did not have a “player” who had business experience or contacts outside of the Financial Services industry. Mark Szollar has joined GDM, with an advertising and sales background, including almost 25 years at The New York Times Co. Mark has focused on print and digital sales and is known as a thought leader on diversity in the workplace. Additionally, often times, our clients hire us for product insights, specifically for the diverse market segments. Tariq and I approached Mark Hug, who was not only a Senior Executive Marketing Officer, but a brilliant actuary as well. Mark, formerly an Executive Vice President at Prudential, spent most of his career bringing focus to...
Would you have had the courage to sign Jackie Robinson?

Would you have had the courage to sign Jackie Robinson?

Are you willing to seek out diverse talent to grow your business? Ground has been broken for a long overdue Jackie Robinson Museum, in lower Manhattan. Jack Roosevelt Robinson, born in 1919, 25 days after the death of Teddy Roosevelt, whose name he carries, was the first African American player hired by Major League baseball on April 15, 1947. It is almost impossible to believe his entrance to baseball was only 70 years ago. Try telling your kids that…. I think they would be amazed! Branch Rickey was the General Manager of the Brooklyn Dodgers and made the controversial and courageous move of signing Robinson, breaking the MLB “color barrier.” This was not an easy task, as Rickey was confronted with societal issues and his colleagues were vehemently opposed to the signing. Rickey sought him out for his outstanding personal character, his UCLA education and rank of Captain in the U.S. Army. He knew that boos, taunts and criticism were going to be directed at Robinson, and that Robinson had to be tough enough to withstand abuse without attempting to retaliate. Robinson was a Superstar:  Rookie of the Year, 6 time All Star, National League MVP, Batting and World Series Champion. He served as a role model for generations who followed. Robinson was not the best player in the Negro Leagues. There were many others such as Satchel Paige and Josh Gibson.   So why then were there no other black players in the league?   The issue was not that there weren’t many great black players available…. there just were not enough Branch Rickey’s!  Are you willing to seek out great talent with the passion and foresight...
DIVERSE AMERICA: Letting people be people

DIVERSE AMERICA: Letting people be people

This picture and story appeared in the New York Daily news and received over 62000 likes. Only in America. A Chinese photographer gave up his seat on a subway to a Hasidic couple. Who then moved over to allow a Muslim woman to nurse her child… all on Easter Sunday! In most countries this would never occur. Sometimes we take for granted just how wonderful and embracing our culture is. Letting people be...
This is amazing- 52% Asian!

This is amazing- 52% Asian!

You must read this… New York City has 8 high level, very sought after high schools. Each year, thousands of high school juniors test and apply for these schools. Of the 5103 accepted students, 52% were Asians! Amazingly Asians only represent 9% of the total New York Student body! Conversely only 7% of Hispanics and 5% of African Americans (26% and17% respectively as a percentage of the total student population) were accepted by these top schools, Demographics of NYC Demographics of NYC Public School Students Students accepted by 8 Specialty Schools 42% White…………………………………………………….28% White 26% Hispanic…………………………………………………7% Hispanic 17% African American…………………………………….5% African American 9% Asians……………………………………………………52% Asian Two take aways. While a very small percentage of the total population, Asians continue to excel. Second, the lack of Hispanic and African American students theses specialty schools accept continue to point to the diversity challenges both academia and businesses continue to...
Surprised to be not surprised

Surprised to be not surprised

Big surprise!!! This weekend was fun. My family went to Carolines on Broadway, a comedy club in NYC, famous as the venue that started the career of famous comedians such as Jerry Seinfeld, Tim Allen, Billy Crystal, Rosie O’Donnell and Jay Leno. We entered the club a bit early and had a quick cocktail at the bar. My wife commented about the huge South Asian crowd gathered for the show. Actually, of the 500 or so attendees, we seemed to be the only Caucasians. Aah. The comedian was Vir Das, the most famous Indian Bollywood comedian. The moral of the story. 500 South Asian customers felt special and felt connected. Dare I say that most would not have attended without that special...